58 Kensington Rd., Charlottetown
877-620-4222

Feeling the thundering of hooves and the roar of the crowd is the kind of unforgettable experience that you can only get at Red Shores Racetrack & Casino. Emerging from its humble origins of dirt-road races between neighboring farmers, harness racing has been a major part of the Island’s heritage.

Each year, fans from all corners of the world visit the Island eager for the thrill of the race. But the real pulse of the racetrack, is not the crowd or the drivers. It’s the horses. From dawn’s earliest light to dusk’s last sigh, their days are filled with a rich blend of attentive care, and routines they thrive off.

We caught up with a trainer and some resident horses to get the rundown on a typical day in the barns. Let’s get a move on and journey through a day in the life of a racehorse at Red Shores Racetrack & Casino.

4:30 AM

The day breaks and the barn comes alive. The horses are woken gently, and their stalls are tidied. Horses usually catch their forty winks standing up, but there’s always a comfy bed of wood shavings for those times they want to get cozy. Meticulously groomed and cared for, the horses greet their trainers and caretakers with eager anticipation. The relationship between humans and horses is built on trust and mutual respect.

7:00 AM

Time to break a sweat! The horses are led out of their stalls and onto the open track. Here, they’ll jog their usual four miles – an essential part of their routine that keeps horses’ race-ready. They love to stretch their legs and enjoy the morning air. On race days, their early morning jog is swapped for a relaxing day, with a warm-up before they hit the starting gate. The daily routine of a horse is critical to their health, and they thrive off it!

11:00 AM

After a good training session, there is nothing better than a refreshing bath. Thankfully, one is waiting for them back at the barns, where trainers will also check the horses over, giving special attention to the legs and hooves.

NOON

Lunch calls! After their bath, the horses are returned to their stalls for some well-earned grains and downtime before the evening. They love to socialize with the barn staff, often bringing out their silly side.

2:30 PM

As the afternoon wears on, the horses will get some hay – a delicious and fibrous snack that they absolutely love. Horses need to eat a lot of hay each day, and sometimes will get a tasty treat thrown in. The horses at Red Shores are all partial to bananas, but apples and carrots make the top three.

4:30 PM

On race days, the evening is buzzing with excitement as the horses are groomed to perfection and geared up to race. Trainers take their horses to warm-up on track before post time.

6:00 PM

It’s showtime! Noses are on the starting gate as the races kick off under the spotlights at the Charlottetown Driving Park. The thundering hooves and cheers from the crowd create an adrenaline-charged atmosphere. Each race is a testament to the hard work and dedication of everyone involved.

10:00 PM

As the races conclude and the winners are celebrated, the horses are led back to their stalls to enjoy a post-race bath and some well-deserved grains. There is always plenty of water and hay to snack on before the horses relax for the evening.

11:00 PM

The day comes to a close as the barns settle into a serene silence. This quiet time is perfect for the horses to rest and recharge their batteries, knowing that tomorrow brings another day of training, dedication, and new victories.

Learn more about Atlantic Canada’s Premier Entertainment Destination at Red Shores!

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